On Saturday, when the library is only open 9-5, I continued working my way through the Bradley County microfilm—mostly tax records.  What the FHL holds is primarily tax book indexes though a few of the actual books were filmed including 1890 so while the indexes indicate that relatives owned enough to be taxed the 1890 book tells you what they owned and owed as well as gives you a fair idea of their neighbors. I managed to get through all of the indexes and the relevant portions of the 1890 Tax Book—largely Palestine Township. In retrospect what I didn’t get to were the early tax books they did have filmed. They’re on my list for next time or my list to order into the Lansing Family History Center—whichever comes first.

The two sections from page 47 of the 1890 tax book below shows one of the entries for my 3rd Great Grandfather Stephen Martin (father of Mattie Martin and grandfather of Rhodie Rogers Trotter) followed by his son-in-law, Austin York.

1890TaxBookp47a 1890TaxBookp47

This day’s research was also an example of technology not always being fast. Running down the time stamps for all the things I scanned… it took hours to get everything I wanted just out of the 1890 Book. I was the last person on the scanners on the 2nd floor that afternoon just trying to cram in my last two copies as the closing announcements ran. Some days you’re on a roll and on others things just take forever.

Happy hunting,

Jess

So it is possible to research from 8 am to 9 pm Tuesday through Friday at the Family History Library. I didn’t manage that any of the days for a variety of reasons (including Red Wings hockey) but I did manage a marathon session from 8 am to 7:30 pm on Day #3 of my Salt Lake City Trip… all focused on my father’s families in Bradley County, Arkansas.

In many ways I’m at a bit of a brick wall with my father’s lines. I have a potential slave owning family (or more accurately, allied families) but no clear cut line to trace. So, my goal was really to look hard at whatever records I could get my hands on in the hopes that along the way a story might emerge. What that translates too is that I went through the majority of the available rolls of microfilm in the FHL from the county—court records, deed books (lots of deed books), tax indexes, tax books. And I have to confess microfilm makes me vaguely motion sick. But it was worth it.

I didn’t come out that day with a new set of names but it did give me solid supporting documents about where my families were, their living situations, and their relationships. For example, the deed books included land transactions, but you could also find contracts ranging from the purchase of “a certain Roan mare colt,” to (in the earliest books) the sale of 8 slaves from son to mother for $1. It’s breath-taking and troubling at the same time.

Finding real documents implying the relative wealth of my 2nd Great Grandfather Sandy York (born in slavery) was fascinating. He was making deals for that roan mare in 1871 and buying land out right by 1885.

YorkforMare

And when going through the earliest records whenever I found anything indicating a slave transaction I copied the related documents. I’m still sifting through those and transcribing in the hope that the information will help someone in their research even it if it isn’t me. These include slaves held by the Ganaway, Ederington, Hampton, Newton, McCammon, and Williamson families so far.

But my find of the day has to be the deed of gift for an undescribed tract of land belonging to the Pagan family to Trustees Monroe Wilfong (the 1st father-in-law of Sandy’s son, my Great Grandfather Phillip Henry York), Andy Wilfong (a relative by marriage), and Mars Ingraham to establish an African Methodist Church—given the families’ early involvement and staunch support I would guess this was a tract meant to house Mt. Olive Church.

MtOliveChurch

 

Happy hunting!

Jess

cousins1950No info on this other than it’s titled Cousins 1950 and is likely taken in Bradley County, Arkansas. They’re so cute!!!

Happy hunting!

Jess

 

BradleyCountyCoupleBradley County researchers, this one’s for you! My family has no idea who these two are. They could be Trotters, Yorks or just friends of the family. We have no idea. We just found this picture among my Grandmother’s photos (along with this one). Anyone recognize this happy looking couple?

As an aside, the woman reminds me so much of someone I went to school with as a child in Michigan.

Happy hunting,

Jessica

 

To date Sandy York (my 2nd Great Grandfather)  is my earliest identified York ancestor. Per the Census he was born a slave in March of 1837 in Virginia to slave parents also born in Virginia. He married his wife Agnes in 1861 and the couple settled in Palestine Township, Bradley County, Arkansas. And according to the 1900 Census they had 13 children, only 10 of which were still living. So far I’ve identified:

  • Susan who married Charley Martin and Henry Webb
  • Albert
  • Philip Henry (my Great Grandfather)
  • Daniel G. who married Elizabeth Martin
  • Edward who married Eliza Martin and Millie Hamilton
  • Mary Lee who died young
  • Agnes or Maggie who may have married Alexander Charles Cabean*
  • Julia who married Joseph Trotter
  • Ida Jane who married Harvey Ross

Sandy York Household, 1880I have had trouble locating Sandy in major sources prior to 1870 but I have found him listed among registered voters in 1867. He also appears frequently in land transaction indexes. In 1871 a sale of cotton to E. B. Turner was recorded. In 1885, 1888, 1890 he bought lots of land from J. T. Johnson, B. F. Previtt, and John D. Pugh. The only sale I found was to his son Edward in 1903. In a compilation of material created by the Bradley County Genealogical Society as an 1890 substitute he was noted as the owner of 160 acres. He was also named as a witness in an inquisition on what was deemed an accidental drowning in 1886.  And as late as 1905 he is listed as having paid his poll tax. He is also listed in the county Index of Marks and Brands on page 122 (which I would dearly love a copy of but haven’t tracked down yet).

Sandy died in (at least) his 70s on 7 May 1909 (105 years ago tomorrow) and was buried at Johnsville Cemetery.

Happy hunting,

Jess

My great grandfather Philip Henry was born around October of 1870, the third child of Sandy and Agnes York. I believe Philip was born in Arkansas and I know the family was in Bradley County by 1871 when Sandy sold $62.50 worth of cotton to E. B. Turner. But I have yet to find the household in the 1870 Census. By the 1880 Census Philip was 11 and listed as working on his father’s farm.

York-Wilfong Marriage License, 1894On Christmas Day 1894 Philip married his first wife Mary H. Wilfong (the daughter of Monroe and Ellen Wilfong) and in fairly rapid succession they had 4 children: Calvin in the following September, Sandy Napoleon in November of 1896, Aunt Rachel in April of 1898, and Frederick Philip in August of 1899. The family is enumerated in the 1900 Census and Philip is listed as renting land and farming as well as being able to read and write (unlike his parents). He is counted immediately following his father’s household and before his younger brother Edward. I’ve also found a note indicating in 1905 Philip had paid his poll tax to be eligible for voting.

York-Philips Marriage License, 1903While I have been unable to find a death certificate or notice, family stories indicate that Mary died young and in December of 1903 Philip married, Mattie C. Philips (the daughter of Shade and Camelia (Howell) Philips). Mattie added five children to the line: Preston Garett, Ossie B., Mary, Walter, and Mamie. When the family was enumerated in the 1910 Census Philip owned (with a mortgage) and worked his farm with the added labor of Calvin and Sandy Napoleon.

York-Wheeler Marriage  License, 1913Again, family stories indicate that Mattie died young and in October of 1913 Philip married his third wife (and my Great-Grandmother) Sallie Wheeler, the daughter of Moses and Candes (Thompson) Wheeler.  Unlike his other wives, Sally brought a small parcel of children born out of wedlock with her into the family—Ressie and Willie B. Wheeler and James Avery. The couple then added Anna, Arverse, Herman Lee, Oscar Shelly, Ernest Philip and finally my Grandmother, Elnora in 1926.

By the 1920 Census the large family was farming on rented land with a few of the older sons working the home farm. This was also after the death of Philip’s father and his mother and older brother, Albert, were also counted in the household. The 1930 Census offered a surprise in the form of a previously unmentioned sibling credited to Philip and Sallie, a daughter named Katheline born in 1928. This is probably actually Katherine York, their granddaughter and the daughter of Mamie York and Willie B. Hampton.

Less than a year later, in March of 1931, Philip died and the following November Sallie followed, leaving the younger children scattered among older siblings and cousins. Grandma remembered time spent in the household of Uncle Sandy and his wife though in 1940 she is listed (as a cousin) in the household of her half-sister Ossie B. and James Rogers.

There’s so many important bits and pieces I’m missing in this family… death dates, information on how the children were parceled out after Sallie’s death, the location of the York families in 1870, just to name a few. Dad’s family is full of roadblocks I’ve yet to skirt but I’ll keep working on it.

Happy hunting,

Jess

As I’ve mentioned in passing before, Levi Hampton is not (to my knowledge) a direct line ancestor but he has been at the center of my research on the Trotter and Johnson families.

Levi Hampton was born into slavery around 1835 in Alabama according to most Census records. His direct descendants pass down a story that he was used as a “Stud” by slave owners and possibly belonged to a plantation owner named Graham but I haven’t been able to verify that. By the time of the 1870 Census he was married to a woman named Sally and had 5 children in their household: Homer, Edward, John, Willie, and Lottie. According to the paperwork associated with his Homestead Application he settles a plot of land in or around January of 1873 and formally applied for the land in September 1884 under the Homestead Act of 1862.

Sally died sometime between the birth of daughter Anna (born in 1876 according to the 1880 Census) and his second marriage to the woman I believe to be my 2nd Great Aunt (and sister to Josephine), Jane Johnson, on 05 Nov 1877. The 1880 Census also enumerated a widowed daughter Mary Hampton. But my guess is that she is actually a daughter-in-law by way of Levi’s son Homer.

Levi Hampton PatentIn September of 1890 Levi testified in the process to prove his claim to the Palestine homestead and the land patent was signed in July of 1891. His testimony also stated that he regularly voted, and a 1905 Poll Tax list for Palestine Township show him as paid in full and qualified to vote.

I have been unable to find Levi’s family in the 1900 and 1920 Census, but the 1910 Census, shows a daughter probably with Jane, Lou Hampton, as well as his nephew (and my Great Grandfather) Harrison Trotter.

I also have a transcription of Levi’s will written in 1916 which names five living children: Ed, John, Willie, Lottie Sims and Orrie Nelson (I’m pretty sure this is Annie Hampton who married John Nelson). He also willed to Harrison Trotter “the small old field southwest of my house on the west 80 acres”—the site of the Trotter Homestead I featured last post.

I know there’s more to know about the Hampton/Johnson/Trotter ties but for now I feel I’ve hit a brick wall—at least until I can get out on the road and locate more Arkansas records.

Happy hunting!

Jess

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