I’ll be presenting:

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“Scandalous Ancestors,” at Ionia County Genealogical Society, Saturday September 9th at 1 pm, at the Freight Station Museum in Lake Odessa.

“African American Genealogy Research,” at Lyon Township Public Library, September 14th at 6:30 pm.

 

“Scandalous Ancestors,” at Marshall District Library, September 19th at 7 pm.

“African American Genealogy Research” and “Cluster Genealogy: Are We Related to Everyone on the Block, at the Genealogical Society of Washtenaw County, October 22nd at 1:30 and 3:30 pm.

Happy hunting!

Jess

PS. I will NOT be wearing heels.

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Morning view looking out over the Alleghany from the David L. Lawrence Convention Center before the Thursday Keynote.

On Thursday, I took advantage of a full set of sessions, attending presentations as varied as the anatomy of military pension, organizing your genetic genealogy, German Church records, and a class on slave research. The standout of the day was Tony Burroughs’ dynamic session “Anatomy of a Pension.” My pension research to this point has been fairly haphazard and this class offered an organized approach to obtaining and analyzing these records. I came out with a better understanding of the process of requesting them from NARA and some ideas for my next steps in researching them—including a gut feeling that I should look up the files that I already have, if I get the chance to do so in person, just to verify I’m not missing anything from the original file. Not a knock on NARA—just a feeling that there’s something odd about the file. So… bumping DC up on my someday road trip list.

I also, managed to fall rather spectacularly while on lunch outside the convention center. Many thanks to the couple who helped me retrieve my things and checked to see that I was ok! Wrenched my ankle and was fairly bruised but I finished out the day and after some care was up and around to start again Friday morning. Note to self… next time pick the attached hotel, you are that much of a klutz.

Happy hunting,

Jess

Wednesday was mostly a travel day for me but I did manage to make it to Pitt for FGS just in time to make the last two Focus on Societies Day sessions—both phenomenal! the society day programs are meant to help society members with ideas to build and revitalize our genealogical societies—sharing ideas for programming, advocacy, best practices, etc.

I went in with a couple of my societies in mind and found myself with pages of notes and a long list of ideas to share. The sessions I attended were on rethinking society outreach—which had fabulous programming ideas from the Kentucky Historical Society as well as encouraged groups to really embed in the community, getting out and involved—and one by Blaine Bettinger on considering DIGs (DNA interest groups) as both society education and outreach/marketing tools. DNA is so popular right now and so NOT intuitive. A DIG would offer a community educational opportunities and support as well as catch the eye of potential Society members. So… how about it Greater Lansing? Do we have a local DIG yet? Anyone interested?

Happy hunting,

Jess

I’ll be posting highlights from my expereiences from FGS this week but I’m going to start a little backwards with my thank yous today…

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The walkway to the dock under the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Yesterday I bid farewell to Pittsburgh after a four days chock-full of genealogy and it feels a little like I’m coming out of the light and being dumped back in the real world. I enjoy conferences as a chance to meet people, to learn new research techniques and records sources, and to just commiserate with and support people in our shared obsession. Many thanks to all the people I chatted with between classes—especially my Michigan and Indiana friends. You all were the reason this was such a fun week and I hope to see you in Fort Wayne next year.

Happy hunting!

Jess

We also went into Warren, the seat of Bradley County, Arkansas and Aunt Linda and I went into the County Court House so I could look into a few things including the Marks and Brands Books. This is a great example of a non-traditional record. These were the formally reported identifying marks or brands on livestock or lumber so that an owner could be legally identified if needed. While my relatives managed to avoid a number of standard genealogical resources here’s one where I could find at least proof of life for a number of my relatives, such as this record about my Great-Great-Grandfather Sandy York.

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Happy hunting,

Jess

We probably spent a little too long exploring Palestine A. M. E. Cemetery considering the heat and the bugs but so many names had a story. And my Aunt wanted to locate her Great Grandfather Mose Wheeler and his wife Josie’s headstone—It wasn’t where we expected, but we found it. And the whole trip just reinforced the strong ties to the community. I honestly believe almost every person buried in that cemetery is represented in my database because they are related by blood or marriage.

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Mose and Josie died four days apart in 1948.

Happy hunting,

Jess

I’ve been running pretty solidly for the last few weeks but I have had a number of wonderful genealogy related experiences in that time.

In the forefront, I owe a large thank you to my aunts who took me back over home to see Johnsville, Arkansas the longtime home of my York, Trotter and allied families and then into Warren, the seat of Bradley County. The trip was two hours from our reunion hotel and the drive was filled with fascinating stories and asides most of which I had never heard before. It was an insightful trip for me and it was very generous of them to spend the day with me.

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I got to see what remains of my great grandmother’s home. It’s awkward because I don’t have the emotional attachment to it. But I found it moving as it currently appears that the woods are reclaiming the land.

Thank you to my Aunts–Linda, Brenda and Alfreda!

Happy hunting,

Jess