May 2014


GraninaTreeFinally!!!  It’s time to get out and commune with nature (like my Gran here)… or at the very least hang out on the back porch by the grill.

Happy hunting!

Jess

 

Here’s one of those family finds that brings a painful truth of history to life…  Not everyone made it across the pond.

Rosetta Suffling was the younger sister of my 4th Great Grandmother and the second known child of William and Elizabeth (Pegg) Suffling. She was born 8 Apr 1805 in Lessingham, Norfolk, England. She married Samuel Gibbs at St. Mary the Virgin Church, Hemsby Parish, Norfolk, England on 25 December 1829. The couple appears to have settled in Hemsby where Samuel worked as farm labor. They had nine children: Samuel Jr, William Suffling, Isaac, Elizabeth, Edmund, Mary Ann, Alfred, James, and Matthew.

GibbsPassengerList1849On 1 May 1849 the family started their journey to the United States boarding the Bark Gov. Hinckley or George Hinckley under the command of Captain William Loring at London. Unfortunately around the middle of May (165 years ago this month) there was an outbreak of cholera aboard ship and by the time the ship arrived in New York on the 12 Jun 1849 10 individuals had died including Rosetta and daughter Mary Ann (both died 21 May), and her sons Edmund and Matthew (both died 23 May).

 

Samuel Gibbs and their remaining children made it to New York and Samuel married Lovina Huff to help raise them. Samuel and Lovina ended up in Barry County, Michigan in the vicinity of their Johnson cousins, my 3rd Great Uncles Matthew (who married his cousin, Elizabeth Gibbs) and John.

Happy hunting,

Jess

For more information on the 19th century sailing lines between America and the world see: Cutler Carl C. Queens of the Western Ocean: The Story of America’s Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines. Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, 1961.

 

BabcockAnd she’s still the life of the party! (Love you, Vicky!)

Have a happy 38th anniversary!

Happy hunting!

Jess

Mom & I, May 2002.

Jess, 1978Because I reserve the right to find embarrassing pictures of the rest of my family, it’s only fair to post one of myself.

I’m ready for some birthday fun in the sun by the pool!

Happy hunting!

Jess

To date Sandy York (my 2nd Great Grandfather)  is my earliest identified York ancestor. Per the Census he was born a slave in March of 1837 in Virginia to slave parents also born in Virginia. He married his wife Agnes in 1861 and the couple settled in Palestine Township, Bradley County, Arkansas. And according to the 1900 Census they had 13 children, only 10 of which were still living. So far I’ve identified:

  • Susan who married Charley Martin and Henry Webb
  • Albert
  • Philip Henry (my Great Grandfather)
  • Daniel G. who married Elizabeth Martin
  • Edward who married Eliza Martin and Millie Hamilton
  • Mary Lee who died young
  • Agnes or Maggie who may have married Alexander Charles Cabean*
  • Julia who married Joseph Trotter
  • Ida Jane who married Harvey Ross

Sandy York Household, 1880I have had trouble locating Sandy in major sources prior to 1870 but I have found him listed among registered voters in 1867. He also appears frequently in land transaction indexes. In 1871 a sale of cotton to E. B. Turner was recorded. In 1885, 1888, 1890 he bought lots of land from J. T. Johnson, B. F. Previtt, and John D. Pugh. The only sale I found was to his son Edward in 1903. In a compilation of material created by the Bradley County Genealogical Society as an 1890 substitute he was noted as the owner of 160 acres. He was also named as a witness in an inquisition on what was deemed an accidental drowning in 1886.  And as late as 1905 he is listed as having paid his poll tax. He is also listed in the county Index of Marks and Brands on page 122 (which I would dearly love a copy of but haven’t tracked down yet).

Sandy died in (at least) his 70s on 7 May 1909 (105 years ago tomorrow) and was buried at Johnsville Cemetery.

Happy hunting,

Jess

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